Why are Africans excluded from the "GLOBAL" Series

A question that has been bugging me and I'm sure thousands of other fellow African FIFA players. Why is Africa almost excluded to participate in the "GLOBAL" series? Only 2 countries out of 54 are eligible to participate, is this even fair when we're dedicating the same amount of time and effort like the rest of the world. We dedicate immense time to play the cruel Weekend League, sweat it out to get the required 27 wins to be FUT Champions Verified, only to be left out without any proper explanation. Why let us register in the first place? May we please get the closure we deserve as players that have loved the game and have had aspirations of competing at the top level for a long time, PLEASE @EA_Andy @EA_Lanna @EA_Rtas @EA_DarDar @EA_Cian

Comments

  • umgee
    290 posts Sunday League Hero
    What country are you and what African countries do they allow?
  • @umgee I am from Malawi, and only countries eligible are Egypt and South Africa
  • Wayno69
    1898 posts Play-Off Hero
    Gonna tell you what I told Krasi, move to Germany.
  • MHoney1234
    10339 posts Has That Special Something
    Wayno69 wrote: »
    Gonna tell you what I told Krasi, move to Germany.

    :D
  • umgee
    290 posts Sunday League Hero
    @umgee I am from Malawi, and only countries eligible are Egypt and South Africa

    Ok cool.

    What's the gaming community like in Malawi? Are there many gamers and such?
  • WarrenBarton
    10986 posts Has That Special Something
    edited December 2019
    In the spoiler is a relevant part from an article early last year regarding internet use in Malawi. I can’t vouch for it’s authenticity etc, but it doesn’t sound like the issue EA’s fault as they sound pretty behind the times with regards to regulating and the infrastructure of internet use in Malawi.

    Link to the whole article is here
    https://mwnation.com/malawi-internet-getting-worse/

    Malawi is among the countries assessed and it is categorised as “partly free”. This category was arrived at for two distinct reasons: the first one is not much different from many countries assessment in the report; it has to do with direct government interference. The assessment finds that there were few cases where online news was subjected to “government manipulation”; the arrest of three opposition members of Parliament (MPs) over a WhatsApp conversation; and various provisions in the Electronic Transaction and Cyber Security Act, 2016, which are deemed as punitive and could be used by the government to “censor online content and dissent.”

    The second reason is what the report calls the “availability and ease of access”. The report indicates that average connection speeds in Malawi have decreased from 1.8 Mbps (mega bit per second) in 2016 to 1.3 Mbps in 2017—comparing the average connection speeds to global average of 7.0 Mbps, one could argue that Malawi really does not have Internet to facilitate any meaningful development. The report observes that this means that Malawi has one of the “lowest and slowest growing rates of the Internet in the world, in stark contrast to the exponential growth in access among its neighbouring countries on the continent.”

    For patriotic and proud Malawians these findings are unwelcome, of course, yet the real problem is that Malawi Government and its policy makers still treat access to the Internet as a luxury that should be punished with punitive tax measures ignoring the fact that Internet is a key driver of socioeconomic activities and therefore, national development. In this day and age, a country cannot attract investors if it doesn’t have stable, affordable and standard Internet connection speeds. Gone are the days when Internet could be viewed through the lens of Facebook and other social media platforms where citizens go pastime, entertainment and gossip.

    The only time one hears Malawi Government officials talking about the Internet is when someone in the position of power, usually politically connected wants social media regulated or some aspects banned. Do Malawians really want to start this conversation when the Internet has not really taken off in the country? Such approach only reduces the discussion to issues of social media abuse, which only begets the questions of censorship and tight control while ignoring the crucial issue of access and infrastructure development that would increase access quantitatively and qualitatively for all Malawians and not the privileged few.
  • Mobehta
    272 posts Sunday League Hero
    In the spoiler is a relevant part from an article early last year regarding internet use in Malawi. I can’t vouch for it’s authenticity etc, but it doesn’t sound like the issue EA’s fault as they sound pretty behind the times with regards to regulating and the infrastructure of internet use in Malawi.

    Link to the whole article is here
    https://mwnation.com/malawi-internet-getting-worse/

    Malawi is among the countries assessed and it is categorised as “partly free”. This category was arrived at for two distinct reasons: the first one is not much different from many countries assessment in the report; it has to do with direct government interference. The assessment finds that there were few cases where online news was subjected to “government manipulation”; the arrest of three opposition members of Parliament (MPs) over a WhatsApp conversation; and various provisions in the Electronic Transaction and Cyber Security Act, 2016, which are deemed as punitive and could be used by the government to “censor online content and dissent.”

    The second reason is what the report calls the “availability and ease of access”. The report indicates that average connection speeds in Malawi have decreased from 1.8 Mbps (mega bit per second) in 2016 to 1.3 Mbps in 2017—comparing the average connection speeds to global average of 7.0 Mbps, one could argue that Malawi really does not have Internet to facilitate any meaningful development. The report observes that this means that Malawi has one of the “lowest and slowest growing rates of the Internet in the world, in stark contrast to the exponential growth in access among its neighbouring countries on the continent.”

    For patriotic and proud Malawians these findings are unwelcome, of course, yet the real problem is that Malawi Government and its policy makers still treat access to the Internet as a luxury that should be punished with punitive tax measures ignoring the fact that Internet is a key driver of socioeconomic activities and therefore, national development. In this day and age, a country cannot attract investors if it doesn’t have stable, affordable and standard Internet connection speeds. Gone are the days when Internet could be viewed through the lens of Facebook and other social media platforms where citizens go pastime, entertainment and gossip.

    The only time one hears Malawi Government officials talking about the Internet is when someone in the position of power, usually politically connected wants social media regulated or some aspects banned. Do Malawians really want to start this conversation when the Internet has not really taken off in the country? Such approach only reduces the discussion to issues of social media abuse, which only begets the questions of censorship and tight control while ignoring the crucial issue of access and infrastructure development that would increase access quantitatively and qualitatively for all Malawians and not the privileged few.

    Nigeria has a better infrastructure but not included despite having loaaadssssssssssss of nigeria based players on line...
  • WarrenBarton
    10986 posts Has That Special Something
    Mobehta wrote: »
    In the spoiler is a relevant part from an article early last year regarding internet use in Malawi. I can’t vouch for it’s authenticity etc, but it doesn’t sound like the issue EA’s fault as they sound pretty behind the times with regards to regulating and the infrastructure of internet use in Malawi.

    Link to the whole article is here
    https://mwnation.com/malawi-internet-getting-worse/

    Malawi is among the countries assessed and it is categorised as “partly free”. This category was arrived at for two distinct reasons: the first one is not much different from many countries assessment in the report; it has to do with direct government interference. The assessment finds that there were few cases where online news was subjected to “government manipulation”; the arrest of three opposition members of Parliament (MPs) over a WhatsApp conversation; and various provisions in the Electronic Transaction and Cyber Security Act, 2016, which are deemed as punitive and could be used by the government to “censor online content and dissent.”

    The second reason is what the report calls the “availability and ease of access”. The report indicates that average connection speeds in Malawi have decreased from 1.8 Mbps (mega bit per second) in 2016 to 1.3 Mbps in 2017—comparing the average connection speeds to global average of 7.0 Mbps, one could argue that Malawi really does not have Internet to facilitate any meaningful development. The report observes that this means that Malawi has one of the “lowest and slowest growing rates of the Internet in the world, in stark contrast to the exponential growth in access among its neighbouring countries on the continent.”

    For patriotic and proud Malawians these findings are unwelcome, of course, yet the real problem is that Malawi Government and its policy makers still treat access to the Internet as a luxury that should be punished with punitive tax measures ignoring the fact that Internet is a key driver of socioeconomic activities and therefore, national development. In this day and age, a country cannot attract investors if it doesn’t have stable, affordable and standard Internet connection speeds. Gone are the days when Internet could be viewed through the lens of Facebook and other social media platforms where citizens go pastime, entertainment and gossip.

    The only time one hears Malawi Government officials talking about the Internet is when someone in the position of power, usually politically connected wants social media regulated or some aspects banned. Do Malawians really want to start this conversation when the Internet has not really taken off in the country? Such approach only reduces the discussion to issues of social media abuse, which only begets the questions of censorship and tight control while ignoring the crucial issue of access and infrastructure development that would increase access quantitatively and qualitatively for all Malawians and not the privileged few.

    Nigeria has a better infrastructure but not included despite having loaaadssssssssssss of nigeria based players on line...

    Yeah Nigeria is a developed nation, same with Ghana (some guy used it to compare to Malawi then called me an idiot, before the post was deleted) so yeah that’s not really fair but then there could be political reasons that we don’t know about.

    But this is a private corporation and not a charitable organisation so you would assume they don’t care massively about equality between nations unless it makes them money or not addressing it could pose a serious danger of muddying their reputation
  • simlejh
    134 posts Has Potential To Be Special
    @umgee I am from Malawi, and only countries eligible are Egypt and South Africa

    I see there is verified players from the following nations too; Djibouti, Morroco, Ghana, Mauritius, Réunion, Senegal. Are you sure they are not able to verify?
  • abbey621
    221 posts Has Potential To Be Special
    Mobehta wrote: »
    In the spoiler is a relevant part from an article early last year regarding internet use in Malawi. I can’t vouch for it’s authenticity etc, but it doesn’t sound like the issue EA’s fault as they sound pretty behind the times with regards to regulating and the infrastructure of internet use in Malawi.

    Link to the whole article is here
    https://mwnation.com/malawi-internet-getting-worse/

    Malawi is among the countries assessed and it is categorised as “partly free”. This category was arrived at for two distinct reasons: the first one is not much different from many countries assessment in the report; it has to do with direct government interference. The assessment finds that there were few cases where online news was subjected to “government manipulation”; the arrest of three opposition members of Parliament (MPs) over a WhatsApp conversation; and various provisions in the Electronic Transaction and Cyber Security Act, 2016, which are deemed as punitive and could be used by the government to “censor online content and dissent.”

    The second reason is what the report calls the “availability and ease of access”. The report indicates that average connection speeds in Malawi have decreased from 1.8 Mbps (mega bit per second) in 2016 to 1.3 Mbps in 2017—comparing the average connection speeds to global average of 7.0 Mbps, one could argue that Malawi really does not have Internet to facilitate any meaningful development. The report observes that this means that Malawi has one of the “lowest and slowest growing rates of the Internet in the world, in stark contrast to the exponential growth in access among its neighbouring countries on the continent.”

    For patriotic and proud Malawians these findings are unwelcome, of course, yet the real problem is that Malawi Government and its policy makers still treat access to the Internet as a luxury that should be punished with punitive tax measures ignoring the fact that Internet is a key driver of socioeconomic activities and therefore, national development. In this day and age, a country cannot attract investors if it doesn’t have stable, affordable and standard Internet connection speeds. Gone are the days when Internet could be viewed through the lens of Facebook and other social media platforms where citizens go pastime, entertainment and gossip.

    The only time one hears Malawi Government officials talking about the Internet is when someone in the position of power, usually politically connected wants social media regulated or some aspects banned. Do Malawians really want to start this conversation when the Internet has not really taken off in the country? Such approach only reduces the discussion to issues of social media abuse, which only begets the questions of censorship and tight control while ignoring the crucial issue of access and infrastructure development that would increase access quantitatively and qualitatively for all Malawians and not the privileged few.

    Nigeria has a better infrastructure but not included despite having loaaadssssssssssss of nigeria based players on line...

    Yeah Nigeria is a developed nation, same with Ghana (some guy used it to compare to Malawi then called me an idiot, before the post was deleted) so yeah that’s not really fair but then there could be political reasons that we don’t know about.

    But this is a private corporation and not a charitable organisation so you would assume they don’t care massively about equality between nations unless it makes them money or not addressing it could pose a serious danger of muddying their reputation

    Be careful, some power hungry Messiah named EA Roger just warned me for saying the same thing. They like Africans money but that's about it, in terms of participation in key events, Spongebob has a higher chance than my people. So let's just pretend the issue does not exist...lol.
  • WarrenBarton
    10986 posts Has That Special Something
    abbey621 wrote: »
    Mobehta wrote: »
    In the spoiler is a relevant part from an article early last year regarding internet use in Malawi. I can’t vouch for it’s authenticity etc, but it doesn’t sound like the issue EA’s fault as they sound pretty behind the times with regards to regulating and the infrastructure of internet use in Malawi.

    Link to the whole article is here
    https://mwnation.com/malawi-internet-getting-worse/

    Malawi is among the countries assessed and it is categorised as “partly free”. This category was arrived at for two distinct reasons: the first one is not much different from many countries assessment in the report; it has to do with direct government interference. The assessment finds that there were few cases where online news was subjected to “government manipulation”; the arrest of three opposition members of Parliament (MPs) over a WhatsApp conversation; and various provisions in the Electronic Transaction and Cyber Security Act, 2016, which are deemed as punitive and could be used by the government to “censor online content and dissent.”

    The second reason is what the report calls the “availability and ease of access”. The report indicates that average connection speeds in Malawi have decreased from 1.8 Mbps (mega bit per second) in 2016 to 1.3 Mbps in 2017—comparing the average connection speeds to global average of 7.0 Mbps, one could argue that Malawi really does not have Internet to facilitate any meaningful development. The report observes that this means that Malawi has one of the “lowest and slowest growing rates of the Internet in the world, in stark contrast to the exponential growth in access among its neighbouring countries on the continent.”

    For patriotic and proud Malawians these findings are unwelcome, of course, yet the real problem is that Malawi Government and its policy makers still treat access to the Internet as a luxury that should be punished with punitive tax measures ignoring the fact that Internet is a key driver of socioeconomic activities and therefore, national development. In this day and age, a country cannot attract investors if it doesn’t have stable, affordable and standard Internet connection speeds. Gone are the days when Internet could be viewed through the lens of Facebook and other social media platforms where citizens go pastime, entertainment and gossip.

    The only time one hears Malawi Government officials talking about the Internet is when someone in the position of power, usually politically connected wants social media regulated or some aspects banned. Do Malawians really want to start this conversation when the Internet has not really taken off in the country? Such approach only reduces the discussion to issues of social media abuse, which only begets the questions of censorship and tight control while ignoring the crucial issue of access and infrastructure development that would increase access quantitatively and qualitatively for all Malawians and not the privileged few.

    Nigeria has a better infrastructure but not included despite having loaaadssssssssssss of nigeria based players on line...

    Yeah Nigeria is a developed nation, same with Ghana (some guy used it to compare to Malawi then called me an idiot, before the post was deleted) so yeah that’s not really fair but then there could be political reasons that we don’t know about.

    But this is a private corporation and not a charitable organisation so you would assume they don’t care massively about equality between nations unless it makes them money or not addressing it could pose a serious danger of muddying their reputation

    Be careful, some power hungry Messiah named EA Roger just warned me for saying the same thing. They like Africans money but that's about it, in terms of participation in key events, Spongebob has a higher chance than my people. So let's just pretend the issue does not exist...lol.

    Thanks bro, hopefully I was careful enough with my language to not cause offence to Rodgie 😇
  • Mobehta wrote: »
    In the spoiler is a relevant part from an article early last year regarding internet use in Malawi. I can’t vouch for it’s authenticity etc, but it doesn’t sound like the issue EA’s fault as they sound pretty behind the times with regards to regulating and the infrastructure of internet use in Malawi.

    Link to the whole article is here
    https://mwnation.com/malawi-internet-getting-worse/

    Malawi is among the countries assessed and it is categorised as “partly free”. This category was arrived at for two distinct reasons: the first one is not much different from many countries assessment in the report; it has to do with direct government interference. The assessment finds that there were few cases where online news was subjected to “government manipulation”; the arrest of three opposition members of Parliament (MPs) over a WhatsApp conversation; and various provisions in the Electronic Transaction and Cyber Security Act, 2016, which are deemed as punitive and could be used by the government to “censor online content and dissent.”

    The second reason is what the report calls the “availability and ease of access”. The report indicates that average connection speeds in Malawi have decreased from 1.8 Mbps (mega bit per second) in 2016 to 1.3 Mbps in 2017—comparing the average connection speeds to global average of 7.0 Mbps, one could argue that Malawi really does not have Internet to facilitate any meaningful development. The report observes that this means that Malawi has one of the “lowest and slowest growing rates of the Internet in the world, in stark contrast to the exponential growth in access among its neighbouring countries on the continent.”

    For patriotic and proud Malawians these findings are unwelcome, of course, yet the real problem is that Malawi Government and its policy makers still treat access to the Internet as a luxury that should be punished with punitive tax measures ignoring the fact that Internet is a key driver of socioeconomic activities and therefore, national development. In this day and age, a country cannot attract investors if it doesn’t have stable, affordable and standard Internet connection speeds. Gone are the days when Internet could be viewed through the lens of Facebook and other social media platforms where citizens go pastime, entertainment and gossip.

    The only time one hears Malawi Government officials talking about the Internet is when someone in the position of power, usually politically connected wants social media regulated or some aspects banned. Do Malawians really want to start this conversation when the Internet has not really taken off in the country? Such approach only reduces the discussion to issues of social media abuse, which only begets the questions of censorship and tight control while ignoring the crucial issue of access and infrastructure development that would increase access quantitatively and qualitatively for all Malawians and not the privileged few.

    Nigeria has a better infrastructure but not included despite having loaaadssssssssssss of nigeria based players on line...

    Yeah Nigeria is a developed nation, same with Ghana (some guy used it to compare to Malawi then called me an idiot, before the post was deleted) so yeah that’s not really fair but then there could be political reasons that we don’t know about.

    But this is a private corporation and not a charitable organisation so you would assume they don’t care massively about equality between nations unless it makes them money or not addressing it could pose a serious danger of muddying their reputation

    Don't really see the issue of opening it up to everyone who's got the talent. I understand our internet infrastructure is not as advanced, but I have personally taken steps to ensure I have an optimal connection for gaming. It sucks that my geolocation would deprive me of such an opportunity when I put in the same effort and achieve similar elite results like the rest of the players participating. But I understand, as a private corporation they owe it to no one.
  • simlejh wrote: »
    @umgee I am from Malawi, and only countries eligible are Egypt and South Africa

    I see there is verified players from the following nations too; Djibouti, Morroco, Ghana, Mauritius, Réunion, Senegal. Are you sure they are not able to verify?

    They might be living in countries that are eligible
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